Thoughts on Trumpcare’s Demise and John McCain

I have thoughts about the final (final?) healthcare vote.

McCain

  • I said McCain was a hypocrite for not voting to send this back to committee. I still think that was his most principled course of actions, and woe be it to the rest of them who didn’t even help kill this monstrosity.
  • That said, having watched it play out, McCain just humiliated the Majority Leader on live television in a monumental spectacle after calling for regular order. It is not clear to me that he could have made a better case for regular order than making it apparent that McConnell’s process was a sham designed to bully McCain and then calling McConnell’s bluff. When McCain demands the next issue is addressed by committing the bill to committee, he has good standing in the caucus to do that. So, I feel like I was right to defend McCain and that he weakly met the spirit of my defense, but not the letter of my analysis?
  • I’m not trying to save face here. I feel good about defending McCain broadly, because I didn’t game the last minutes of McConnell’s pressure cooker plan out right. Nonetheless, I think there was a higher road to be taken. I was kind of wrong? I was kind of right?
  • There’s a larger lesson here. McConnell would not have gone to the floor if he’d seen this coming. McCain kills A LOT of bills, but normally he has the decency to pull this stunt in a back room. McCain is known as a maverick because when he doesn’t like a bill, he puts in the hard, important work of finding a few others and negotiating with whichever party is in charge. Outlets like FiveThiryEight (who, granted, have him parting ways with Trump more often than almost anyone else in his party) are stuck counting only those bills that make it to the floor. McCain is such a powerhouse because he keeps things off the floor that can never be counted, or gets large concessions that make it easier for him to swallow the bad parts. He’s not a Democrat, and you shouldn’t expect him to torpedo GOP legislation because you don’t like it. But McCain privately shapes legislation in profound ways.
  • Murkowski and Collins displayed much more consistency through this process and good on them.
  • McConnell should resign. He won’t. But he should.
  • Paul Ryan’s big plan for Tax Reform hinged on billions of dollars of savings from this bill. So, the next legislative set piece for the House is in bad shape. They will figure something out and it will be a mess. Get ready to fight.
  • What, precisely, is protecting Trump now? The antics of his Interior Secretary likely pushed Murkowski away. He’s a giant electoral and international liability, the Trump/Russia affair stinks of illegal activity, and now he’s without a legislative agenda to offset that. Expect more Republican Senators to really warm to the idea of getting to the bottom of this. They won’t say the words “President Pence seems better” while cameras are running, but they are saying it to each other.
  • Even set off from quotes, I feel dirty typing the words “President Pence”. *shudder*
  • Both McConnell and Schumer got tears in their eyes during their post-vote speeches. Not enough men cry in the public sphere, so, I’m all here for Schumer getting misty eyed because activism helped kill this bill. However, McConnell looked about ready to cry because his plan to deny treatment that would save tens of thousands of American lives per year failed in a humiliating way after he tried to cheat his way through the process. I do not kid: I was ready to drink them.
  • There is talk of repealing the 17th Amendment so that Senators cannot scuttle legislation. Two things. First, that means the likes of Mike Huckabee are getting the lesson that they did not play enough dirty tricks. That’s super gross and a window into why the GOP needs to be removed from the majority ASAP. Second, the idea that Portman would have defied his governor if he was counting on his support for reappointment is bonkers. The whole point of having states appoint Senators (as was originally done) was that they would have to think about what their state government wanted, while Representatives would have to think about what their constituents directly wanted. Ohio, West Virginia, and Arizona would have killed this more decisively!

There’s a lot more to be said, especially parsing McCain’s principles here. But this was not only a victory for those who think protecting healthcare access in this country is important, but also for those who believe that long, boring committee meetings are the only way they are going to improve it.

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